Barnier/Davis hold press conference after second round of Brexit talks

Speaking after four days of negotiations, the Chief Negotiator for the EU, Michel Barnier, today said there has been no “decisive progress” on the key issues in the ongoing Brexit negotiations.

Opening the joint press conference this afternoon, Mr Barnier noted that at the beginning of the week he publicly voiced his concern at the pace of and (lack of) progress in the talks. He warned that “time is passing quickly”, noting that on the 29th March 2019, at the stroke of midnight, the UK will officially leave the EU.

Mr Barnier queried whether an organised “properly, orderly exit for the UK” would take place, or would the UK exit without an agreement. He said it was in the interests of Europe for the UK to leave with an established agreement.

Mr Barnier said firmly that UK demands regarding access to the Single Market were “impossible”. Worryingly for the UK Government, who are keen to start discussing future trade arrangements, he said he was “quite far” from being able to say to EU leaders in October that sufficient progress has been made to move the talks on at that point to cover the future trade relationship. As protecting the integrity of the single market is central to his mandate, the Single Market “must not and will not be undermined by Brexit”.

Concluding his remarks, Mr Barnier said that this week it had become clear that the UK does not accept that it needs to recognise its financial obligations after Brexit. He noted that, going forward, he is prepared to intensify negotiations.

Following the EU’s Chief Negotiator, the Secretary of State for Exiting the EU, David Davis, spoke of “concrete progress” in a number of areas but added there was some way yet to go.

Mr Davis said the UK’s approach has been informed by a series of detailed papers, offering pragmatic solutions and proposing options, not a single approach. He said the UK Government will publish a comparison on the UK and EU positions in due course.

Mr Davis said issues relating to withdrawal and the future relations are “inextricably linked”, and central to this process must be a desire to deliver the best outcome.

On the financial settlement, Mr Davis said the UK has a duty to taxpayers to “interrogate” the EU’s position, which its negotiators did this week. Whilst the UK has a different legal stance, it accepts that there must be a settlement in accordance with the law, and in the interests of the future relationship. There are “still significant differences” to be bridged.

Describing the third round of talks as productive, Mr Davis said there was a high degree of convergence on Ireland, and on CTA. There had been almost complete agreement on privilege issues, and on confidentiality.

Concluding his remarks, Mr Davis expressed his hope both sides would continue to work together constructively. He added that further papers would be published by the Department for Exiting the European Union in the coming weeks.

And with that, it is apparent that the European Council meeting, 19th – 20th October, is a key date for the UK Government, as EU leaders seek to determine whether the ‘sufficient progress’ test has been passed.

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