Brexit, Borders, and lack of progress – news round-up.

Brexit negotiations: round four

Brexit: Fresh round of negotiations to take place [BBC News]

Brexit: Davis sees ‘no excuse for standing in way of progress’ [BBC News] The fourth round of Brexit negotiations commenced this week. This was the first opportunity for the EU delegation to respond to Theresa May’s recent speech in Florence.

As talks commenced, the EU’s Chief Negotiator, Michel Barnier, called for a “moment of clarity” from the UK. Mr Barnier said the process had been going six months and progress on key separation issues was essential. Mr Barnier said he was “keen and eager” for the UK to translate the “constructive” sentiments in Mrs May’s recent Florence speech into firm negotiating positions on issues such as citizens’ rights, the Irish border and financial issues, including the UK’s so-called divorce bill.

He issued a reminder that the UK was “six months into the process” and “we are getting closer to the UK’s withdrawal.”

Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, David Davis, said he hoped for progress on all fronts – but made clear any agreement on financial matters could only be reached in the context of the UK’s future partnership with the EU. He said there were “no excuses for standing in the way of progress”.

About progress…

Brexit: Donald Tusk says not enough progress in talks [BBC News]

Donald Tusk: ‘No sufficient progress yet’ in Brexit talks [POLITICO EU] European Council President Donald Tusk has said not enough progress has been made to move to the next phase of Brexit talks in Brussels. Speaking after talks with Prime Minister Theresa May, Mr Tusk said: “I feel now we will discuss our future relations with the UK once there is so-called sufficient progress. The two sides are working and we will work hard at it. But if you ask me and if today member states ask me, I would say there is no sufficient progress yet. But we will work on it.”

Mr Tusk’s comments come barely a month before the European Council will decide whether sufficient progress has been made to begin trade talks, as the UK wants. If it is determined that ‘sufficient progress’ has not been made, the EU’s negotiators will be directed to continue focusing the negotiations on the issues of citizens’ rights, the financial settlement and the Northern Irish border. They will not allowed to move to discussions about a transition period or the future trade relationship sought by the UK.

Northern Ireland and the border: round four

Brexit: Northern Ireland and Irish border on talks agenda [BBC News NI] Northern Ireland and the Irish border were discussed at the Brexit negotiations on Wednesday. Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, David Davis, said UK and EU negotiators will be “crunching through the technical detail” of the Good Friday peace agreement and the Common Travel Area (CTA).

Meanwhile, the view south of the border…

Leo Varadkar: ‘Too early’ to assess Brexit progress [BBC News] Prime Minister Theresa May met Taoiseach Leo Varadkar in London for talks on Brexit and Northern Ireland’s political deadlock. During her recent speech in Florence, Mrs May had reiterated the UK’s position that there would be no hard Irish border after Brexit. Although the UK will be leaving both the customs union and the single market, she said that both the UK and EU had “stated explicitly” they would not accept any “physical infrastructure”. Speaking after the talks, Mr Varadkar said he had encouraged Mrs May to be “more specific” about her view of the future UK-Irish relationship. He added that he thought it was too early to determine whether the UK has made sufficient progress during the Brexit negotiations.

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